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Prosem Lecture: Effect of Sensory Properties of Food on Swallowing Physiology in Adults. A Systematic Review

November 30, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Presenter: Rodolfo Pena Chavez, M.S., Doctoral Student, Ciucci Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin – Madison
Topic: Effect of Sensory Properties of Food on Swallowing Physiology in Adults. A Systematic Review

Rodolfo Pena Chavez, M.S.
Rodolfo Pena Chavez, M.S.

Rodolfo Peña-Chávez, Nicole Schaen-Heacock, Mary Hitchcock, Atsuko Kurosu, Michelle Ciucci, Nicole Rogus-Pulia

Sensory properties of food and liquids provide sensory input that can modify swallowing physiology in both healthy adults and patients with dysphagia. The purpose of this systematic review was to understand which specific properties of food and liquids are associated with changes in swallowing physiology in adults with and without dysphagia.

Six databases were systematically searched by two reviewers from inception through January 15th of 2020 to identify relevant studies that included only human subjects, instrumental assessment of the swallowing, and both healthy adults and patients with dysphagia. Full text reviews of abstracts that met inclusion criteria were completed, and relevant data were extracted independently.

The search yielded 3,344 unique abstracts. Of the 160 abstracts that underwent full text review, 75 were accepted. 3 of these studies were randomized controlled trials and 72 were non-randomized including: cohort, case-control, cross-sectional, and longitudinal studies. Results of 69 studies showed an influence of physiochemical bolus properties on swallowing physiology. Specific properties found to be associated with changes in various aspects of swallowing physiology included viscosity (150-3931cp; 37/41 studies); taste (sour, sweet, and salty; 22/26 of studies); texture (hardness; 8/8 studies); and chemesthesis (natural capsaicin and carbonation; 11/11 studies). Study population, study inclusion criteria, and method for quantifying change in swallowing physiology varied among studies. 48 studies focused on healthy adults and 27 on patients with dysphagia. For swallowing assessment, the following instrumental methods were used in the included studies: videofluoroscopy (29), surface electromyography (15), tongue pressure measurement (11), fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (8), pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (3), scintigraphy (5), computerized tomography (1), electromagnetic midsagittal articulography (2), and ultrasonography (1).

Variations in the viscosity, taste, texture, and chemesthetic properties of solids and liquids were found to modify swallowing physiology in both healthy adults and patients with dysphagia. These data will be critical as a foundation for scientists and clinicians to collaboratively develop beverages and foods that optimize swallowing function for patients with dysphagia.


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Details

Date:
November 30, 2020
Time:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Event Category:

Venue

Online: Zoom